Posts Tagged ‘facebook’

I’m always nagging students, colleagues and random people in bars about the fact the web is not just a publishing platform, it’s a tool that can make you a better journalist irrespective of how your content reaches an audience.

It’s a hard sell when you’re giving examples involving the BBC or a Guardian tech reporter.

But I had a simple win today when I tweeted out a call via www.twitter.com/sunderlandecho asking for anyone planning to buy the iPad to drop me a line for a feature I’m writing. Two people duly did and as a result I have case studies with local relevance for my piece. Plus, a relevant local government body got back to me offering their input.

The alternative would have involved digging out some rent-a-quote or – worse still – just asking around the office to see if someone knew anyone who might be the type…

With authorative quotes, background and info, this extra source will lift the piece. Had I ignored Twitter, or shunned the web as some folk seem to, my output in Friday’s newspaper would have been weaker. Simple as that.

>> Newsdesk also tell me that one of the reporters was stuck for fillers at the weekend and put out a call for community events of Facebook. She got a pile of responses from local people. Everyone’s a winner.

Many thanks to David Banks, co-author of McNae’s Essential Law for Journalists, for these answers, and to those of you who sent questions.

Is a commercial website such as a newspaper’s able to use even a few seconds of a song or piece of music without having to pay royalties? A common belief used to be that as long as the clip was under 30 seconds you were ok…
The defence here is fair dealing. It works for printed material, extracts of books, plays,  films etc. So long as your extract does not extract the entire value of the original material  you should be ok. Remember you have to accredit

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